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The Pros and Cons of Video Verification

We’ve already touched on video verification, and how it provides a more reactive form of video surveillance and security than video monitoring. But if video verification doesn’t offer the same kind of live security, why is it becoming so popular, and why has it been so successful?

Keep reading to see the pros and cons of video verification, and how it can help you secure your property.


First, What Exactly is Video Verification?

Unlike live security monitoring, where a security company actively monitors your CCTV surveillance feeds and responds to incidents before they happen, video verification is not monitored around-the-clock. Instead, it records snippets of video when an incident occurs, and sends those snippet to the security company, who reviews it and verifies the problem. If there’s a problem, the security company alerts the police.

Thus, it is more of a reactive, as opposed to proactive, solution. While the police will treat the event as “in-progress,” as opposed to a potential problem, by the time they or a security company arrives on the scene, the incident could already be over – and the damage done.


So Why Get A Video Verification System?

If video verification cannot prevent incidents and has a much slower reaction time, why even opt for it over live video monitoring?

There are, actually, a few benefits to this kind of system.

It Prevents False Alarms

Whether from faulty alarm systems, oversensitive sensors responding to animals, wind or weather, or a homeowner accidentally setting of their alarm system, over 90% of alarms that police respond to, are false. Many municipalities and police forces are now only responding to alarms that have been verified as legitimate.

Instead of dispatching the police every time something this captured on camera, the process can ensure response is only sent out to a verified, security incident – which will save the police time and allow them to respond to real emergencies. It will also save you money, if the police fined you for a false alarm. If that’s important to you, Video Verification can be a wise implementation.

Priority 1 vs Priority 3

Because it prevents false alarms, video verification can ensure faster and more certain response from law enforcement. While the security monitoring company many not respond to the incidents captured on a verification system as quickly as a live event, once the incident is verified, the police will take it more seriously. Verified incidents are classified as Priority 1 events by law enforcement, and are treated as “in progress,” receiving an immediate response. Unverified events, on the other hand, are classified as Priority 3, and the police do not respond to them as quickly due to the rash of false alarms.

watching business security cameras

Video Verification is Also Cheaper

Video Verification can also be a cost-saver when full CCTV monitoring systems are not necessary and could be prohibitively expensive. As they are not monitored around-the-clock, like video monitoring systems, video verification is less expensive to operate and maintain. And while in the past, video verification systems were expensive and cumbersome to install, they have become much simpler and more affordable in recent years.

Recent developments in video verification systems and technology now allow them to work with a wide variety of cameras and systems, from inexpensive IP camera systems with built-in video verification and analytics, to more expensive and comprehensive surveillance systems designed specifically for video verification. This allows video verification systems to be a good compromise between the full security of video monitoring and low cost of less systems.

So, no matter what security camera system you have installed, there will be a video verification system that will integrate easily.

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